Installing MacPorts on MacOS “High Sierra”

Update: The official MacPorts installer is out. Go get it! https://www.macports.org/install.php

Another year, another OS X update. I assume you are here because you downloaded the High Sierra GM from Apple, and were disappointed that there isn’t a MacPorts installer yet.  While I am sure they will release it soon, perhaps we can get you over the hump so you can beat up High Sierra before the official drop date.  If you are comfortable compiling software by hand, we should be able to get thru this easy-peasy.

I am doing this on a clean install of High Sierra. If you are attempting an upgrade from any previous version, your process may vary in unexpected ways.  You will want to make sure you’ve downloaded the latest version of Xcode, and you should probably follow the MacPorts uninstall instructions so you have less cruft around that could interfere with the process.  If you have an upgrade issue, please comment here and I’ll do my best to help you out and improve the instructions.

This is my first pass at getting it running.  I’m going to share all my steps.  One or two things I do might be unnecessary, and could be removed later if I refine the process; but I promise I wouldn’t have hit the Publish button if the overall process didn’t work.

 

  1. Install MacOS “High Sierra”
  2. Connect to the internet
  3. Install Xcode 9 from the App Store.
  4. Launch Xcode:
    1. Agree to the license.
    2. Let it install the extra components it says it needs.
    3. Quit xcode.
  5. Open a terminal window:
  6. sudo bash
  7. xcode-select --install
  8. When the pop-up launches, install the command line tools.
  9. cd ~/Desktop
  10. mkdir macports
  11. cd macports
  12. curl -O https://distfiles.macports.org/MacPorts/MacPorts-2.4.1.tar.gz
  13. tar -xzvf MacPorts-2.4.1.tar.gz
  14. cd MacPorts-2.4.1
  15. ./configure --enable-readline
  16. make
  17. make install
  18. echo 'export PATH=/opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:$PATH' >> ~/.profile
  19. source ~/.profile
  20. port -v selfupdate

At this point, you should be ready to start reinstalling your ports! Wee!

After manually installing MacPorts with the above instructions I was able to install subversion and wget, which are my usual two first validation tests.  Subversion alone has a total of 33 dependencies alone, and combined they have 135 dependent packages; which does a pretty good job of verifying MacPorts is working.

Memory. It’s a funny thing.

Memory is such a funny thing.  Scrambled and chaotic, it doesn’t have a user accessible file structure or an index, and the search engine is for crap.  Sherlock referred to it as his Mind Palace.  I find that term particularly apt, because in reality you are not standing in the middle of a field with your memories stretching out in all directions and plainly visible if you just look in the right direction.  Rather, it seems like my memories are piled up in corners, stacked on flat surfaces, and wedged between unrelated volumes.  My point of reference seems to dictate what I can perceive, and due to the chaos I might be standing in the middle of a room of related memories, but I can’t see the one I left in the hallway.  This framework was painfully reinforced today.

It’s been a rough week.  I’ve spent a lot of it wracked with grief.  This morning was different, though.  Instead of grief I have been high strung with anxiety.  I couldn’t figure out the source.  I vacillated between wanting to go to work to be around people, and wanting to stay home and hide.  At the top of my thoughts was that I had a package arriving today, and did I want to be home for it or did I just want to get it later.  Over and over, round and round, it was diving me crazy.  In the end, I went to work because it was the least financially impacting decision when all the other factors kept cancelling each other out over and over.

What was the package?  Does it matter?  It was a cute kickstarter I bought into a few months ago.  Custom designed coins done in the style of depression era hobo coins.  Hobo coins were crafted works of art that used coins as the base, but with intricate designs inlaid over the original design of the coin.  I saw the kickstarter on BoingBoing, and thought they would make really cool trinkets to give to friends and strangers.

So, having decided to do something, rather than get stuck in an indecision loop, I headed to work.  I’m walking own Market Street, on my way to my office, and my phone chimes with a delivery notice.  My hobo coins have arrived.  Cool, right?

My next thought was “Now I can give Sam and Elliot… the… coins… I… got… them…” and Boom!  I’m leaning against a lamp post on Market Street bawling my eyes out.  Sure, I’ve been thinking about Elliot, and thinking about the coins arriving, but as my conscious mind moved around my Mind Palace, it was never at the right spot to see the various memories in the same frame.  My subconscious mind, on the other hand, really wanted me to just go back to bed and avoid this day all together.

Memory.  It’s a funny thing.

Installing MacPorts on OS X 10.11 ‘El Capitan’

High Sierra Update:  If you are looking for instructions on how to manually install MacPorts onto the High Sierra GM release, check here:  Installing MacPorts on MacOS “High Sierra”

Update: MacPorts has released their official El Capitan installer. You should probably use it instead. 🙂

Update: Since people are ignoring my above comment, I have updated the below instructions to reflect the version changes reported by Chrisp in the comments.

Another year, another OS X update.  If you are like me, you’ve weaseled a copy of the OS X 10.11 ‘El Capitan’ Gold Master installer, and you have started checking to see how much of your software is going to break if and when you install.  Given the issues I’ve had in the past, MacPorts is the very first thing I test.  🙂

The first thing I noticed is that there is no El Capitan installer for MacPorts, and the Yosemite installer will not run on OS X 10.11.  So, we are back to compiling it ourselves.  Fortunately, this goes pretty smoothly.

The first caveat is that in addition to needing access to OS X 10.11 ‘El Capitan’ , you will need a copy of Xcode 7 (beta, RC, etc).  You won’t be able to compile MacPorts for El Capitan with Xcode 6 because of changes to one or more of the header files that ship with the OS X 10.11.

The second caveat is that I did a clean install of OS X 10.11 ‘El Capitan’, so my instructions may not adequately deal with any cruft left over by previous installs.  If you have an upgrade issue, please comment here and I’ll do my best to help you out and improve the instructions.  You may want to follow the MacPorts uninstall instructions before starting the below steps.

  1. Install OS X 10.11 ‘El Capitan’
  2. Install Xcode 7
  3. Launch Xcode:
    1. Agree to the license.
    2. Let it install the extra components it says it needs.
    3. Quit xcode.
  4. Open a terminal window:
    1. sudo bash
    2. export PATH=/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin
    3. xcode-select --install
    4. cd Desktop
    5. mkdir macports
    6. cd macports
    7. curl -O https://distfiles.macports.org/MacPorts/MacPorts-2.3.4.tar.gz
    8. tar xzvf MacPorts-2.3.4.tar.gz
    9. cd MacPorts-2.3.4
    10. ./configure --enable-readline
    11. make && make install
    12. echo 'export PATH=/opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:$PATH' >> ~/.profile
    13. source ~/.profile
    14. port -v selfupdate

At this point, you should be ready to start reinstalling your ports!  Wee!

If you see this error at step 4-10:

checking for Apple Foundation library... no
configure: WARNING: GNUSTEP_SYSTEM_ROOT is not defined in your environment, preventing the use of GNUstep's Foundation library
configure: error: Could not find a working Foundation implementation

It means you either have not installed Xcode 7 GM, or that you are running Xcode 7 Beta.  Xcode 6 doesn’t know how to handle the changes to /System/Library/Frameworks/Foundation.framework/Headers/Foundation.h that happened with El Capitan.  The configure script is able to find the header file, but the test compile fails so it reports that the Apple Foundation library isn’t there.

If you are running Xcode Beta, you can get around this by using the following command in the shell you opened above, and then going back to step 4-10:  (Thank you SadDigger for the comment on Reddit!)

xcode-select -s /Applications/Xcode-beta.app

Update 2015-09-15 11:06AM – Fixed a typo in instruction 4-3 where WordPress was converting a double-hyphen into an extended hyphen.  I have also updated it to the latest version of MacPorts, so that the final just updates the ports rather than rebuilding the whole thing. Sorry about that!